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English II Honors

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VOCABULARY FROM ANTIGONE

Prologue                                     Episode II                                         Episode V

calamity                                       magnitude                                             omen

prerogative                                  imprecation                                           carrion

meddle                                        libation                                                  bandy

denounce                                     obstinate                                             Exodos

Parados                                     transgress                                             swoon

sate                                             dire                                                     discretion

arrogant                                     renown                                                 ominous

impious                                     reconcile

rampart                                     lurk

frenzy                                       subverter

tempestuous                             taunt

Episode I                               Choral Ode II

edict                                        insolence

rally                                        illusion

scorn                                     Episode III

lament                                     enmity

mangle                                     vindicate

requite                                     prudently

connive                                     censure

lure                                           intimidate

verdict                                       prosperity

despondent                                 Choral Ode IV

barricade                                     havoc

appalled                                      awry

contrive                                     Episode IV

prevail                                         verge

devastate                                     Choral Ode V

vile                                                 quell

suffice                                             spurn

ply                                                 constraint

Choral Ode II

tempest

 

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Structure of the Greek Theater

 

 

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Reading Guide Questions for Antigone

As you begin this assignment, please be aware that you must ALWAYS be able to support your ideas with evidence from the text.

  The Prologue

  1. What does Antigone want Ismene to do?
  2. What is Ismene’s response?
  3. What are your first impressions of Antigone and Ismene?  Be specific and be able to support your ideas with references to the text.
  4. What are the dominant personality traits of each?
  5. Which sister is the stronger? Support your opinion with specific references to the text.
  6. Now, look at the other sister and present an argument that she is the stronger—again, support your opinion

Critical thinking questions:

  1. What point is Sophocles trying to make with this opening scene?
  2. Draw a conclusion from looking at your responses to questions 5 & 6.

  The Parados (First Ode)

  1. What events of the previous day is the chorus relating?
  2. Throughout the play the chorus will state moral lessons about things that please the gods and things that offend the gods. Find a line that states a moral lesson. (n.b. You will want to keep a running list of these as you read the play.)
  3. What is the mood of the chorus as they begin this new day?

Challenge Question:

  1. Find a line that suggests that the chorus does not hold Polyneices fully responsible for his actions.

Episode I

  1. Read Creon’s lines 160-190 carefully. List the points in order that he makes in his first speech to the town elders.
  2. What is his edict?
  3. Why do you think he makes all of those “points” before he delivers his edict?
  4. What is the reaction of the chorus leader to the edict?
  5. What news does the guard bring?
  6. Describe the personality of the guard.
  7. How does the chorus leader react to the guard’s news? Draw a conclusion about the chorus leader.
  8. How does Creon react to both the news of the guard and the response of the chorus leader? Draw a conclusion about Creon.
  9. What does Creon accuse the guard of? What is his evidence?
  10. What does Creon accuse the townspeople of? What is his evidence?

  Critical thinking questions:

  1. Draw some conclusions about Creon.
  2. What examples of irony do you find in this scene?
  3. Find a line that might serve as a foreshadowing of events to come.
  4. What lines strike you as being important/significant?  Why?

  Second Ode

  1. List in order the things that make Man wonderful.
  2. What one thing “limits” his power?
  3. What moral lesson is stated by the chorus?
  4. To which character(s) does this moral lesson apply?

  Episode II

  1. Why has the guard returned?
  2. What does he relate to Creon about Antigone and the body?
  3. What is Antigone’s tone with Creon? Draw a conclusion about Antigone.
  4. Read lines 439-512 carefully. What logical points do Antigone and Creon make in their argument?
  5. Bottom line—What angers Creon the most about what Antigone has done? Draw a conclusion about Creon.
  6. What does Creon accuse Ismene of? What is his evidence?
  7. What does Ismene confess to?
  8. What is Antigone’s reaction?
  9. How does Antigone treat her sister in this scene? Draw a conclusion about Antigone.
  10. Draw a conclusion about Ismene from this scene.

  Critical thinking questions:

  1. Go back and look at your response to question #4. What point do you think Sophocles is trying to make by developing the argument in this way?
  2. Go back and look at you impression of Ismeme in the Prologue. Have your views changed?  
  3. Sophocles gives Ismene only 2 scenes in this play. What points is he trying to make through her character?
  4. What do you think is the tragic flaw of Antigone?
  5. What do you think is the tragic flaw of Creon?

Third Ode

  1. In this ode, the chorus presents both a moral lesson and an observation on life—a “fact of life.” What are they?

Episode III

  1. In the beginning of the scene, Creon asks Haemon, “Are you my loyal son, whatever I may do?” (line 619). Look very carefully at Haemon’s response (lines 635-638). How is he really answering the question? Draw a conclusion about Haemon.
  2. What logical points does Creon make in lines 639-689?
  3. What is the reaction of the chorus leader?
  4. Examine Haemon’s first speech (lines 683-722).

    1. What “psychological strategies” does he use in speaking with his father? What has he said? Not said?
    2. Find examples of how Haemon gives Creon an “out”—a way to change his mind and still “save face.”
    3. What two analogies does Haemon use to show the dangers of being stubborn?
  1. What is the chorus leader’s reaction to Haemon’s points?
  2. What is Creon’s response to the chorus leader? Draw a conclusion about Creon.
  3. What does Haemon threaten to do if Creon kills Antigone?
  4. How does Creon respond? Draw a conclusion.
  5. Creon has changes the method of execution. What would his reasons be for his change? Draw a conclusion about Creon.

  Critical thinking questions:

  1. Compare Creon’s argument with Antigone in Episode II and his argument with Haemon in this scene. Draw a conclusion about Creon’s level of logic in both arguments.

  Fourth Ode

  1. What points does the chorus make about the power of love?
  2. To which character(s) do these observations apply?

Commos

  1. What is Antigone most concerned about as she faces death?
  2. What is the chorus leader’s response?
  3. How does Antigone react?
  4. What does the chorus leader say is Antigone’s tragic flaw?

  Episode IV

  1. What reason does Antigone now give for why she buried Polyneices?
  2. Read lines 920-928—carefully. What is Antigone saying? What is her tone?
  3. Read lines 928-932 carefully. Paraphrase these lines.

  Critical thinking questions:

  1. Do you think that Antigone really believed that she would be put to death for what she did? Support your opinion.
  2. Put yourself in Antigone’s place. What would you think might happen if Creon sentenced you to death? What might you expect to have happen?

  Fifth Ode

  1. The chorus mentions another force against which man is powerless. What is it? This is the third “force” that the chorus has mentioned in the play. What are the other two?

  Episode V

  1. Why has Teiresias come to see Creon?
  2. What specific evidence does he offer to prove that the gods are angry with Creon?
  3. How does Creon respond?
  4. What does he accuse Teiresias of?
  5. What is Teiresias’ prophecy?
  6. Read lines 1091-1102 carefully. Draw a conclusion about Creon based on his statements to the chorus leader.

Critical thinking questions:

  1. What is the significance of the fact that Teiresias is a blind prophet?
  2. Compare and contrast episodes III and V. What points do you think Sophocles is trying to make by putting Haemon and Teiresias in the play?

  Sixth Ode

  1. To which god is the chorus praying?
  2. What is the tone or mood of the choruss?

  Exodos

  1. What news does the messenger bring?
  2. Who hears the news?
  3. What is the result?
  4. Highlight the lines in the text in which Creon recognizes his flaw and repents.
  5. In his grief Creon prays for death. What is the chorus leader’s response?
  6. Read lines 1348-1352 carefully. Paraphrase these lines.

  Critical thinking question:

  1. Why do you think Antigone committed suicide? Draw a conclusion about her character.

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 COMPARE AND CONTRAST WORKSHEET

ANTIGONE/ISMENE

ANTIGONE/ISMENE

SIMILARITIES

(give supportive evidence)

DIFFERENCES

(give supportive evidence)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONCLUSION--What point is Sophocles trying to make?

 

 

 

 

COMPARE AND CONTRAST

ANTIGONE/CREON

ANTIGONE/CREON

SIMILARITIES

(give supportive evidence)

DIFFERENCES

(give supportive evidence)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONCLUSION--What point is Sophocles trying to make?

 

 

 

 

COMPARE AND CONTRAST

HAEMON/TEIRESIAS

HAEMON/TEIRESIAS

SIMILARITIES

(give supportive evidence)

DIFFERENCES

(give supportive evidence)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONCLUSION--What point is Sophocles trying to make?

 

 

 

 

  

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